Posts Tagged ‘RECYCLING’

3 years of Reverse Vending “Recycle and Reward” at IKEA Glasgow

February 15, 2016

Recycle and Reward Reverse Vending – Zero Waste Scotland – Cash for cans and bottles

February 2013 to  February 2016

3 years of Reverse Vending in Scotland at IKEA Glasgow

Recycle and Reward ay IKEA

At IKEA, shoppers will be able to recycle any glass, plastic or aluminium drinks containers purchased from the restaurant, shop, or vending machines in their Glasgow store. Once returned and deposited through the machine, for each item shoppers will be offered the choice of a 10p voucher to redeem in-store or a 10p donation to one of the stores’ selected charities.
Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Environment Richard Lochhead said:
“Years ago, we thought nothing of taking our empty glass bottles back to the shops with the added bonus of getting cash back in our pocket. Now thanks to modern technology we are breathing new life into this traditional approach through the Recycle and Reward scheme. By offering customers incentives such as money back or vouchers for recycling their glass bottles and cans when out shopping, at college or at a music festival, I hope we can encourage more people to recycle on the go.

3 Years ago the Scottish Government’s Environment Secretary has helped to launch the first ‘Recycle and Reward’ Reverse Vending schemes in Scotland aimed at encouraging people to recycle empty bottles and cans.

Left to right : Gina Jones , Marketing and Sustainability Specialist IKEA Glasgow , Jim McShee – Scottish Sales Manager - Reverse Vending Corporation.

Left to right : , Jim McShee – former Scottish Sales Manager – Reverse Vending Corporation presenting Award to Gina Jones , Marketing and Sustainability Specialist IKEA Glasgow.

The machines at IKEA Glasgow have worked without fault for over 3 years, both IKEA and their customers are very happy with the “Recycle and Reward” project.

(L-R) Sofie Rogers, Store Sustainability Responsible (IKEA); Richard Lochhead, Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Environment; Iain Gulland, Director Zero Waste Scotland; Sean McArthur, Food Manager and Sustainability Manager (IKEA) in front of a reverse vending pilot project for glass , aluminium and PET at the Edinburgh IKEA store.

(L-R) Sofie Rogers, Store Sustainability Responsible (IKEA); Richard Lochhead, Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Environment; Iain Gulland, Director Zero Waste Scotland; Sean McArthur, Food Manager and Sustainability Manager (IKEA) in front of a reverse vending pilot project for glass , aluminium and PET at the Edinburgh IKEA store.

Part of the Scottish Government’s Zero Waste Scotland programme, this pilot programme will look at ways in which schemes which offer incentives such as vouchers, donations to charities or money back may increase recycling rates and reduce the amount of used drinks containers going to landfill.

ikea_reward

Iain Gulland, Director, Zero Waste Scotland, said: “It’s vital that we consider fresh approaches to boosting recycling rates and capturing the value of materials which would otherwise be sent straight to landfill. Through this pilot, we want to assess the impact of this approach which has proved successful around the world, including in Germany, South Australia and Scandinavia. It’s important we change the way people view waste in Scotland and we’ll be looking at how incentivising these recycling schemes impacts on recycling rates and complements other schemes designed to capture valuable materials, including kerbside, recycling centres and banks.”

Iain Gulland, Director, Zero Waste Scotland,

Iain Gulland, Director, Zero Waste Scotland, said:

“It’s vital that we consider fresh approaches to boosting recycling rates and capturing the value of materials which would otherwise be sent straight to landfill.  

“Through this pilot, we want to assess the impact of this approach which has proved successful around the world, including in Germany, South Australia and Scandinavia.  It’s important we change the way people view waste in Scotland and we’ll be looking at how incentivising these recycling schemes impacts on recycling rates and complements other schemes designed to capture valuable materials, including kerbside, recycling centres and banks.”

The aims of these trials are to understand public acceptance of such schemes and the impact they might have in terms of increasing recycling rates and the quality of materials deposited as well as seeing whether they help prevent litter. I’ve talked up the importance of these trials over the past year, not because I’m particularly pro-deposit return, but because I’m keen to have a debate about what the future might hold for recycling systems here in Scotland.

I’ve been lucky to see deposit schemes in operation around the world.  In some areas they have helped recycling rates for packaging such as plastic bottles and cans reach 85%, compared with current rates in Scotland of less than 30%. Deposit schemes appear to engage with consumers in a way that many of our kerbside collections only dream about. Isn’t it time we wondered why?

But increasing recycling isn’t the full story. Quality of material is also important, especially if our priority is how to best benefit Scotland’s economy.

In Adelaide in Australia, I toured an aggregation centre for their deposit scheme that has been in place since the 1970s. There I witnessed bales of the highest quality plastics bottles, and cans. An established system for collecting plastic to such an obvious high quality would, I believe, strengthen the business case for plastics reprocessing facilities in Scotland, bringing investment and jobs as well as quality material recycled back into production. A report from Spain on a proposed deposit scheme there suggested that as many as 14,000 jobs could be created. What could a deposit system mean for Scottish jobs?

Of course I accept that there are counter arguments and potential consequences of  moving to a deposit scheme approach and I am, as ever happy, to debate these.  I think it is essential we continue to think about how we collect materials in order to develop our economy, not just for today but into the future.

Anyone who saw the History of Rubbish series on the BBC last year will know that collections systems have always evolved and I have a feeling that things will change again.  Of course, that might not just mean deposit schemes; it could also include shifting to service models, buying not leasing, or more retailer take-back schemes.

We are increasing our understanding of how important it is to look at the whole system in terms of resource supply and use.  The trials we launched today may or may not hold all of the answers, but at the very least they should ignite a debate on how systems might be re-thought to ensure we do get the most from our resources, just as we all believe we should.

Please visit Zero Waste Scotland Website for more informtion

To learn more, please visit the Scottish Governments Website

Please visit Reverse Vending Corporation’s Website 

What is Reverse Vending ?

Reverse Vending Machines, (RVM’s) are automated machines that utilise advanced technology to identify, sort, collect and process used beverage containers.

The IKEA “Recycle and Reward” project is an Award Winning Project

Ross Burns a Project Manager from Zero Waste Scotland – was voted as the winner of the “Young Recycler of The Year” 2013

Young Recycler of the Year Award 2013 - Winner Ross Burns - host Sally Magnusson - Hugh Stewart Shank

Young Recycler of the Year Award 2013 – Winner Ross Burns – host Sally Magnusson – Hugh Stewart Shank

The IKEA  “Recycle and Reward” Project also won the coveted Gold Green Apple Award

Winners of a 2014 Green Apple Award

Winners of a Gold Green Apple Award

Please contact Reverse Vending Corporation for further information > website 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

3 Years ago ( Original Press Release)

IKEA LAUNCHES RECYCLE AND REWARD SCHEME

 

Reverse Vending BottleBill Project Scotland Reverse Vending Corporation

Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Environment Richard Lochhead

IKEA paves the way for Scotland with modern recycling

 

IKEA is amongst nine companies and organisations trialling a Recycle and Reward Scheme, which will reward people for recycling glass, aluminium and plastic (PET) drinks containers through a range of incentives such as money back, discount vouchers or loyalty point by using the reverse vending machine.

 

Recycle and Reward ay IKEA

At IKEA, shoppers will be able to recycle any glass, plastic or aluminium drinks containers purchased from the restaurant, shop, or vending machines in their Edinburgh and Glasgow stores. Once returned and deposited through the machine, for each item shoppers will be offered the choice of a 10p voucher to redeem in-store or a 10p donation to one of the stores’ selected charities.
Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Environment Richard Lochhead said:
“Years ago, we thought nothing of taking our empty glass bottles back to the shops with the added bonus of getting cash back in our pocket. Now thanks to modern technology we are breathing new life into this traditional approach through the Recycle and Reward scheme. By offering customers incentives such as money back or vouchers for recycling their glass bottles and cans when out shopping, at college or at a music festival, I hope we can encourage more people to recycle on the go.

Shoppers will be able to recycle any glass, plastic or aluminium drinks containers purchased from the restaurant, shop, or vending machines in IKEA Edinburgh and Glasgow stores.  Once returned and deposited through the ‘IKEA Reverse Vending’ machine, each customer will be offered the choice of a 10p voucher to redeem in-store or a 10p donation to one of the stores’ selected charities.

Recycle and Reward , IKEA , Zero Waste Scotland , Reverse Vending ,

Thanks to new trials from Zero Waste Scotland and IKEA you can get something back for recycling!

 

It is hoped that the local pilot projects, part of the Scottish Government’s Zero Waste Scotland programme, will encourage people to recycle more in order to limit the amount of used drinks containers going to landfill.

IKEA_EDINBURGH_REVEND

Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Environment Richard Lochhead visited IKEA in Edinburgh today to see the first of the ‘reverse vending’ machines and hear how the retailer is introducing the scheme in its Scottish stores as a key part of its sustainability programme. The scheme also launches today at IKEA Glasgow.

 

Reverse Vending at IKEA

IKEA Reverse Vending Machine gives 10p reward for each used IKEA drink can or bottle returned through a Reverse Vending Machine

Theo Wiedenmann, Store Manager, IKEA Glasgow, said:

“At IKEA, we are committed to ensuring sustainability is at the heart of what we do. We have many different initiatives in place in stores across the UK and also as a company, so we are thrilled to be the first business to trial the ‘Reward and Recycle’ scheme at both of the Scottish stores. We are excited about this great addition to IKEA Glasgow and hope it will play apart in making sure recycling is always front of mind for both our customers and co-workers alike.”

IKEA is no stranger to sustainability with many schemes and initiatives taking place at both IKEA Glasgow and IKEA Edinburgh.

Nationwide IKEA is campaigning to raise awareness of making the ‘smarter switch to a better bulb’ in order to help families struggling with ever-increasing energy bills, and encourage sustainable living in the home. From February 2013, the retailer announced its investment of £1.1 million to halve the price of its ‘LEDARE’ LED light bulbs in a bid to help millions of UK consumers save up to a third on their energy bills by using less energy in their homes. LED lighting uses 85% less energy than incandescent bulbs and can last up to 20 years – 20 times longer than traditional incandescent bulbs.

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‘Cash for bottles’: Back to the future for Northern Ireland recycling?

June 29, 2015

A “money back” recycling scheme, in which used drinks containers are exchanged for cash, could be re-introduced in Northern Ireland.

Northern Ireland’s Environment Minister Mark H Durkan said it could help to reduce litter and boost recycling.

He said a deposit scheme, where the public received 10p for each glass bottle they returned, had operated in Northern Ireland in the past.

The minister is awaiting the results of similar pilot projects in Scotland.

Norther_Ireland

‘Potential costs’

Over the last two years, the Scottish government has been exploring how a Deposit Return System (DRS) for drinks bottles and cans could work within its jurisdiction.

It asked Zero Waste Scotland to commission a feasibility study, the results of which was published last month.

The Scottish research found there were no major obstacles to a DRS recycling scheme, but industry leaders issued a warning about the potential costs to businesses.

Mr Durkan has now asked his own officials in Stormont’s Department of Environment to begin work on a feasibility study in Northern Ireland.

“It’s something I’ve been thinking about since I actually took up my ministerial role nearly two years ago now,” Mr Durkan told BBC Radio Foyle.

“I’m always keen to explore ideas about how we move towards a zero waste society, which is my ultimate ambition and I believe that’s an ambition which should be shared by all of us.”

Mark_Durkan

Mr Durkan said he believed the ending of the previous cash-back bottle recycling scheme in Northern Ireland was cost-driven, because “advances in production” methods had reduced the price of manufacturing drinks containers.

‘Back to go forward’

However, he said the public and businesses were now more aware that cheaper production methods could mean long-term costs for the environment.

“We, as a society, have changed a lot over the years,” the minister said.

“We haven’t always changed for the better and I think it’s important that we do everything we can to change for the better again, and if that means going back to go forward, I’m certainly prepared to do that.

“We know a lot more about recycling now, we know a lot more about the damage the practices we have been carrying out over decades and centuries have been doing to the environment.”

In a statement, Mr Durkan’s department said the proposed system would accept the “broadest range of materials and the suggested deposit would be between 10p and 20p, depending on volume”.

“Deposits would be returned manually by retailers or through automated reverse vending machines,” it added.

Original Story BBC News >> 

 

Reverse Vending www.reversevending.co.uk

Reverse Vending Machine installed at St Bartholomew’s Hospital (Barts) London

April 23, 2015

A  reVend  Reverse Vending Recycling machine supplied by Reverse Vending Corporation was today (23rd April 2015)  installed in the Main Entrance of St Bartholomew’s Hospital (Barts) London.

St Bartholomew's Hospital (Barts), is a leading, internationally renowned teaching hospital based in the City of London.

St Bartholomew’s Hospital (Barts), is a leading, internationally renowned teaching hospital based in the City of London.

Reverse Vending at St Bartholomew's Hospital (Barts),

Reverse Vending at St Bartholomew’s Hospital (Barts),

The  Reverse Vending Recycling machine installed in the Main Entrance is giving staff, patients and visitors the opportunity to be rewarded for recycling.

The reVend Reverse Vending Recycling machine issues a voucher enabling the recycler to enter a competition to win a bike.

Reverse Vending at St Bartholomew's Hospital (Barts),

Reverse Vending at St Bartholomew’s Hospital (Barts),

Reverse Vending at St Bartholomew's Hospital (Barts),

Reverse Vending at St Bartholomew’s Hospital (Barts) recyclers could “Win this Bike”!

This reVend Reverse Vending Recycling machine accepts used drink containers , diverting valuable resources from Landfill

The reVend Reverse Vending Recycling machine then segregates, compacts and stores the  empty used drink cans and used drink bottles, giving the user a reward.

Reverse Vending at St Bartholomew's Hospital (Barts),

Reverse Vending Machine at St Bartholomew’s Hospital (Barts) compacts the used drink bottles and drink cans, ready for recycling

The reVend Reverse Vending Recycling machine, reduces the need for bin emptying and reduces waste volumes allowing for the products to be bailed and sold, leading to cost savings and carbon savings.

St Bartholomew's Hospital (Barts), is a leading, internationally renowned teaching hospital based in the City of London.

St Bartholomew’s Hospital (Barts), is a leading, internationally renowned teaching hospital based in the City of London.

The machines sends an email when it is nearly full and needs emptying

revend Telemetry

revend Telemetry

Barts Health NHS Trust are leading the way 

This will be the third Reverse Vending Machine (supplied by Reverse Vending Corporation) the organisation has installed – the first, at their Whipps Cross Hospital site has recycled so many plastic bottles that stacked end to end they would reach around the circumference of the London Eye.

First reVend Reverse Vending Machine installed ina Hospital

First reVend Reverse Vending Machine installed in a Hospital

Here is the Story about the Whipps Cross Hospital Machine >> Webpage 

This will be the third Reverse Vending Machine (supplied by Reverse Vending Corporation) the organisation has installed – the second, at their Royal London Hospital site has recycled so many plastic bottles that stacked end to end they would reach around the circumference of the London Eye.

Recycle your empty container at the site in the Reverse Vending Machine by; Placing your empty can or bottle into the machine Listening to the crushing Pressing the screen or button to receive a voucher

Recycle your empty container at the site in the Reverse Vending Machine by;
Placing your empty can or bottle into the machine
Listening to the crushing
Pressing the screen or button to receive a voucher

Here is the Story about the London Royal Hospital Reverse Vending Machine > > Webpage

 

The reVend Reverse Vending Machines have  won a coveted Green Apple Award >> Webpage

The Reverse Vending Team with their Green Apple Award at the Houses of Parliament award ceremnony

The Reverse Vending Team with their Green Apple Award at the Houses of Parliament award ceremnony

 

Barts Health NHS Trust sends zero waste to landfill, and is constantly pushing boundaries in healthcare waste management. Working in partnership with Skanska, waste costs have been reduced by over £2 million over the last 3 years.

This has been achieved through a behavioural change and audit team who offer clinical waste segregation training to all staff, alongside the streamlining of collections. Our hard work has been externally recognised, with the trust being the first NHS Trust in the UK to be awarded the Carbon Trust Standard for Waste.

Source of Original Story >>https://reversevending.wordpress.com/

2 years of Reverse Vending at IKEA Glasgow

February 11, 2015

Recycle and Reward Reverse Vending – Zero Waste Scotland – Cash for cans and bottles

February 2013 to  February 2015

2 years of Reverse Vending in Scotland at IKEA Glasgow

Recycle and Reward ay IKEA

At IKEA, shoppers will be able to recycle any glass, plastic or aluminium drinks containers purchased from the restaurant, shop, or vending machines in their Glasgow store. Once returned and deposited through the machine, for each item shoppers will be offered the choice of a 10p voucher to redeem in-store or a 10p donation to one of the stores’ selected charities.
Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Environment Richard Lochhead said:
“Years ago, we thought nothing of taking our empty glass bottles back to the shops with the added bonus of getting cash back in our pocket. Now thanks to modern technology we are breathing new life into this traditional approach through the Recycle and Reward scheme. By offering customers incentives such as money back or vouchers for recycling their glass bottles and cans when out shopping, at college or at a music festival, I hope we can encourage more people to recycle on the go.

2 Years ago the Scottish Government’s Environment Secretary has helped to launch the first ‘Recycle and Reward’ Reverse Vending schemes in Scotland aimed at encouraging people to recycle empty bottles and cans.

Left to right : Gina Jones , Marketing and Sustainability Specialist IKEA Glasgow , Jim McShee – Scottish Sales Manager - Reverse Vending Corporation.

Left to right : , Jim McShee – Scottish Sales Manager – Reverse Vending Corporation presenting Award to Gina Jones , Marketing and Sustainability Specialist IKEA Glasgow.

The machines at IKEA Glasgow have worked without fault for over 24 months, both IKEA and their customers are very happy with the “Recycle and Reward” project.

(L-R) Sofie Rogers, Store Sustainability Responsible (IKEA); Richard Lochhead, Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Environment; Iain Gulland, Director Zero Waste Scotland; Sean McArthur, Food Manager and Sustainability Manager (IKEA) in front of a reverse vending pilot project for glass , aluminium and PET at the Edinburgh IKEA store.

(L-R) Sofie Rogers, Store Sustainability Responsible (IKEA); Richard Lochhead, Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Environment; Iain Gulland, Director Zero Waste Scotland; Sean McArthur, Food Manager and Sustainability Manager (IKEA) in front of a reverse vending pilot project for glass , aluminium and PET at the Edinburgh IKEA store.

Part of the Scottish Government’s Zero Waste Scotland programme, this pilot programme will look at ways in which schemes which offer incentives such as vouchers, donations to charities or money back may increase recycling rates and reduce the amount of used drinks containers going to landfill.

ikea_reward

Iain Gulland, Director, Zero Waste Scotland, said: “It’s vital that we consider fresh approaches to boosting recycling rates and capturing the value of materials which would otherwise be sent straight to landfill. Through this pilot, we want to assess the impact of this approach which has proved successful around the world, including in Germany, South Australia and Scandinavia. It’s important we change the way people view waste in Scotland and we’ll be looking at how incentivising these recycling schemes impacts on recycling rates and complements other schemes designed to capture valuable materials, including kerbside, recycling centres and banks.”

Iain Gulland, Director, Zero Waste Scotland,

Iain Gulland, Director, Zero Waste Scotland, said:

“It’s vital that we consider fresh approaches to boosting recycling rates and capturing the value of materials which would otherwise be sent straight to landfill.  

“Through this pilot, we want to assess the impact of this approach which has proved successful around the world, including in Germany, South Australia and Scandinavia.  It’s important we change the way people view waste in Scotland and we’ll be looking at how incentivising these recycling schemes impacts on recycling rates and complements other schemes designed to capture valuable materials, including kerbside, recycling centres and banks.”

The aims of these trials are to understand public acceptance of such schemes and the impact they might have in terms of increasing recycling rates and the quality of materials deposited as well as seeing whether they help prevent litter. I’ve talked up the importance of these trials over the past year, not because I’m particularly pro-deposit return, but because I’m keen to have a debate about what the future might hold for recycling systems here in Scotland.

I’ve been lucky to see deposit schemes in operation around the world.  In some areas they have helped recycling rates for packaging such as plastic bottles and cans reach 85%, compared with current rates in Scotland of less than 30%. Deposit schemes appear to engage with consumers in a way that many of our kerbside collections only dream about. Isn’t it time we wondered why?

But increasing recycling isn’t the full story. Quality of material is also important, especially if our priority is how to best benefit Scotland’s economy.

In Adelaide in Australia, I toured an aggregation centre for their deposit scheme that has been in place since the 1970s. There I witnessed bales of the highest quality plastics bottles, and cans. An established system for collecting plastic to such an obvious high quality would, I believe, strengthen the business case for plastics reprocessing facilities in Scotland, bringing investment and jobs as well as quality material recycled back into production. A report from Spain on a proposed deposit scheme there suggested that as many as 14,000 jobs could be created. What could a deposit system mean for Scottish jobs?

Of course I accept that there are counter arguments and potential consequences of  moving to a deposit scheme approach and I am, as ever happy, to debate these.  I think it is essential we continue to think about how we collect materials in order to develop our economy, not just for today but into the future.

Anyone who saw the History of Rubbish series on the BBC last year will know that collections systems have always evolved and I have a feeling that things will change again.  Of course, that might not just mean deposit schemes; it could also include shifting to service models, buying not leasing, or more retailer take-back schemes.

We are increasing our understanding of how important it is to look at the whole system in terms of resource supply and use.  The trials we launched today may or may not hold all of the answers, but at the very least they should ignite a debate on how systems might be re-thought to ensure we do get the most from our resources, just as we all believe we should.

Please visit Zero Waste Scotland Website for more informtion

To learn more, please visit the Scottish Governments Website

Please visit Reverse Vending Corporation’s Website 

What is Reverse Vending ?

Reverse Vending Machines, (RVM’s) are automated machines that utilise advanced technology to identify, sort, collect and process used beverage containers.

The IKEA “Recycle and Reward” project is an Award Winning Project

Ross Burns a Project Manager from Zero Waste Scotland – was voted as the winner of the “Young Recycler of The Year” 2013

Young Recycler of the Year Award 2013 - Winner Ross Burns - host Sally Magnusson - Hugh Stewart Shank

Young Recycler of the Year Award 2013 – Winner Ross Burns – host Sally Magnusson – Hugh Stewart Shank

The IKEA  “Recycle and Reward” Project also won the coveted Gold Green Apple Award

Winners of a 2014 Green Apple Award

Winners of a Gold Green Apple Award

Please contact Reverse Vending Corporation for further information > website 

 

 

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

2 Years ago ( Original Press Release)

IKEA LAUNCHES RECYCLE AND REWARD SCHEME

 

Reverse Vending BottleBill Project Scotland Reverse Vending Corporation

Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Environment Richard Lochhead

IKEA paves the way for Scotland with modern recycling

 

IKEA is amongst nine companies and organisations trialling a Recycle and Reward Scheme, which will reward people for recycling glass, aluminium and plastic (PET) drinks containers through a range of incentives such as money back, discount vouchers or loyalty point by using the reverse vending machine.

 

Recycle and Reward ay IKEA

At IKEA, shoppers will be able to recycle any glass, plastic or aluminium drinks containers purchased from the restaurant, shop, or vending machines in their Edinburgh and Glasgow stores. Once returned and deposited through the machine, for each item shoppers will be offered the choice of a 10p voucher to redeem in-store or a 10p donation to one of the stores’ selected charities.
Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Environment Richard Lochhead said:
“Years ago, we thought nothing of taking our empty glass bottles back to the shops with the added bonus of getting cash back in our pocket. Now thanks to modern technology we are breathing new life into this traditional approach through the Recycle and Reward scheme. By offering customers incentives such as money back or vouchers for recycling their glass bottles and cans when out shopping, at college or at a music festival, I hope we can encourage more people to recycle on the go.

Shoppers will be able to recycle any glass, plastic or aluminium drinks containers purchased from the restaurant, shop, or vending machines in IKEA Edinburgh and Glasgow stores.  Once returned and deposited through the ‘IKEA Reverse Vending’ machine, each customer will be offered the choice of a 10p voucher to redeem in-store or a 10p donation to one of the stores’ selected charities.

 

It is hoped that the local pilot projects, part of the Scottish Government’s Zero Waste Scotland programme, will encourage people to recycle more in order to limit the amount of used drinks containers going to landfill.

IKEA_EDINBURGH_REVEND

Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Environment Richard Lochhead visited IKEA in Edinburgh today to see the first of the ‘reverse vending’ machines and hear how the retailer is introducing the scheme in its Scottish stores as a key part of its sustainability programme. The scheme also launches today at IKEA Glasgow.

 

Reverse Vending at IKEA

IKEA Reverse Vending Machine gives 10p reward for each used IKEA drink can or bottle returned through a Reverse Vending Machine

Theo Wiedenmann, Store Manager, IKEA Glasgow, said:

“At IKEA, we are committed to ensuring sustainability is at the heart of what we do. We have many different initiatives in place in stores across the UK and also as a company, so we are thrilled to be the first business to trial the ‘Reward and Recycle’ scheme at both of the Scottish stores. We are excited about this great addition to IKEA Glasgow and hope it will play apart in making sure recycling is always front of mind for both our customers and co-workers alike.”

IKEA is no stranger to sustainability with many schemes and initiatives taking place at both IKEA Glasgow and IKEA Edinburgh.

Nationwide IKEA is campaigning to raise awareness of making the ‘smarter switch to a better bulb’ in order to help families struggling with ever-increasing energy bills, and encourage sustainable living in the home. From February 2013, the retailer announced its investment of £1.1 million to halve the price of its ‘LEDARE’ LED light bulbs in a bid to help millions of UK consumers save up to a third on their energy bills by using less energy in their homes. LED lighting uses 85% less energy than incandescent bulbs and can last up to 20 years – 20 times longer than traditional incandescent bulbs.

Reverse Vending ® New Website

August 21, 2013

Reverse Vending ® is an International company that specialise in reverse vending systems, installation,material recovery and recycling, through its experienced management team in RV technology, recycling and waste management.

Reverse Vending ®

Reverse Vending ® New Website

Reverse Vending ® website 

Reverse Vending ® new website layout includes several changes largely meant to optimize the reader experience and consolidate content from all  ” Reverse Vending ®” websites.

Features:

  • 100% Responsive Design
  • Retina Ready
  • Minimalistic
  • Tablet and Smart Phone ready
  • 30 Color Variations
  • FullWidth & Boxed Versions
  • HTML5 Validated
  • Google webfont directory support (500+ Fonts)
  •  Sliders
  • 24 HTML5 files
  • Browsers compatibility
  • Custom Backgrounds & Patterns
  • Working Contact Form (with working PHP file)
  • Touch-Ready Image Sliders
  • Unlimited Image Sliders
  • PSD File Included
  • Social Media
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Pintrest
  • Flckr
  • Tumblr
  • Google+
  • Smooth jQuery effects
  • Well Organized and Commented Code

Reverse Vending ® provides a total environmental reverse vending recycling solution package including design and installation,regular maintenance services and full waste management services.

Thanks to Jamie (webmaster) , Carol and Steve for their imput.

Reverse Vending ® Team

Reverse Vending ®  is a Registered Trademark

Contact Reverse Vending

REVERSE VENDING RECYCLING AWARD 2013

June 27, 2013

REVERSE VENDING CORPORATION

RECYCLING AWARD 2013

Left to right : Gina Jones , Marketing and Sustainability Specialist IKEA Glasgow , Jim McShee – Scottish Sales Manager - Reverse Vending Corporation.

Left to right : , Jim McShee – Scottish Sales Manager – Reverse Vending Corporation presenting Award to Gina Jones , Marketing and Sustainability Specialist IKEA Glasgow.

REVERSE VENDING CORPORATION

RECYCLING AWARD 2013

Presented to IKEA GLASGOW

The First Retailer in Scotland 

To install “Deposit System”

reVend Reverse Vending Machines

Reverse Vending Corporation presented an Award to IKEA Glasgow for being  ” The First Retailer in Scotland To install “Deposit System” reVend Reverse Vending Machines.

IKEA LAUNCHES RECYCLE AND REWARD SCHEME

IKEA paves the way for Scotland with modern recycling

IKEA is amongst nine companies and organisations trialling a Recycle and Reward Scheme, which will reward people for recycling glass, aluminium and plastic (PET) drinks containers through a range of incentives such as money back, discount vouchers or loyalty point by using the reverse vending machine.

Shoppers will be able to recycle any glass, plastic or aluminium drinks containers purchased from the restaurant, shop, or vending machines in IKEA Edinburgh and Glasgow stores.  Once returned and deposited through the ‘IKEA Reverse Vending’ machine, each customer will be offered the choice of a 10p voucher to redeem in-store or a 10p donation to one of the stores’ selected charities.

IKEA Reverse Vending Machine gives 10p reward for each used IKEA drink can or bottle returned through a Reverse Vending Machiine

IKEA Reverse Vending Machine gives 10p reward for each used IKEA drink can or bottle returned through a Reverse Vending Machiine

It is hoped that the local pilot projects, part of the Scottish Government’s Zero Waste Scotland programme, will encourage people to recycle more in order to limit the amount of used drinks containers going to landfill.

IKEA Light Bulb Machine

Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Environment Richard Lochhead visited IKEA to see the first of the ‘reverse vending’ machines and hear how the retailer is introducing the scheme in its Scottish stores as a key part of its sustainability programme.

Reverse Vending BottleBill Project Scotland Reverse Vending Corporation

Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Environment Richard Lochhead

http://www.recycle-and-reward.co.uk/

Theo Wiedenmann, Store Manager, IKEA Glasgow, said:

“At IKEA, we are committed to ensuring sustainability is at the heart of what we do. We have many different initiatives in place in stores across the UK and also as a company, so we are thrilled to be the first business to trial the ‘Reward and Recycle’ scheme at both of the Scottish stores. We are excited about this great addition to IKEA Glasgow and hope it will play apart in making sure recycling is always front of mind for both our customers and co-workers alike.”

IKEA is no stranger to sustainability with many schemes and initiatives taking place at both IKEA Glasgow and IKEA Edinburgh.

Nationwide IKEA is campaigning to raise awareness of making the ‘smarter switch to a better bulb’ in order to help families struggling with ever-increasing energy bills, and encourage sustainable living in the home. From February 2013, the retailer announced its investment of £1.1 million to halve the price of its ‘LEDARE’ LED light bulbs in a bid to help millions of UK consumers save up to a third on their energy bills by using less energy in their homes. LED lighting uses 85% less energy than incandescent bulbs and can last up to 20 years – 20 times longer than traditional incandescent bulbs.

Notes :

IKEA was established in 1943 by Ingvar Kamprad at the age of 17, in Småland in Sweden.

IKEA is the world’s leading home furnishing retailer with a grand total of 287 IKEA stores in 26 countries/territories that are visited by 655 million people every year. IKEA UK has 18 stores and IKEA Ireland has 1 store.  The first IKEA store in the UK was opened in Warrington in 1987.

The IKEA Group has 131,000 co-workers in 41 different countries over four continents. 106,500 in Europe, 16,500 in North America and 8,000 in Asia and Australia. There are 7200 employees currently working at IKEA UK and Ireland organisation.

IKEA has a range of 9,500 different home furnishing products.

Sales for the IKEA Group for the financial year 2011 increased by 6.9 per cent to a total of 24.7 billion Euros compared to 2010. Despite the tough economic climate, IKEA UK has reported that total sales for the year to 31 August 2011 of £1.15 billion.

IKEA had 42million visitors in the UK stores.

Last year, the annual IKEA catalogue was printed in 208 million copies, 59 editions and in 30 languages. In total, the catalogue was read by 400 million people in 41 countries.  Ingvar Kamprad penned all the text himself until 1963.