Archive for the ‘Reverse Vending’ Category

3 years of Reverse Vending “Recycle and Reward” at IKEA Glasgow

February 15, 2016

Recycle and Reward Reverse Vending – Zero Waste Scotland – Cash for cans and bottles

February 2013 to  February 2016

3 years of Reverse Vending in Scotland at IKEA Glasgow

Recycle and Reward ay IKEA

At IKEA, shoppers will be able to recycle any glass, plastic or aluminium drinks containers purchased from the restaurant, shop, or vending machines in their Glasgow store. Once returned and deposited through the machine, for each item shoppers will be offered the choice of a 10p voucher to redeem in-store or a 10p donation to one of the stores’ selected charities.
Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Environment Richard Lochhead said:
“Years ago, we thought nothing of taking our empty glass bottles back to the shops with the added bonus of getting cash back in our pocket. Now thanks to modern technology we are breathing new life into this traditional approach through the Recycle and Reward scheme. By offering customers incentives such as money back or vouchers for recycling their glass bottles and cans when out shopping, at college or at a music festival, I hope we can encourage more people to recycle on the go.

3 Years ago the Scottish Government’s Environment Secretary has helped to launch the first ‘Recycle and Reward’ Reverse Vending schemes in Scotland aimed at encouraging people to recycle empty bottles and cans.

Left to right : Gina Jones , Marketing and Sustainability Specialist IKEA Glasgow , Jim McShee – Scottish Sales Manager - Reverse Vending Corporation.

Left to right : , Jim McShee – former Scottish Sales Manager – Reverse Vending Corporation presenting Award to Gina Jones , Marketing and Sustainability Specialist IKEA Glasgow.

The machines at IKEA Glasgow have worked without fault for over 3 years, both IKEA and their customers are very happy with the “Recycle and Reward” project.

(L-R) Sofie Rogers, Store Sustainability Responsible (IKEA); Richard Lochhead, Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Environment; Iain Gulland, Director Zero Waste Scotland; Sean McArthur, Food Manager and Sustainability Manager (IKEA) in front of a reverse vending pilot project for glass , aluminium and PET at the Edinburgh IKEA store.

(L-R) Sofie Rogers, Store Sustainability Responsible (IKEA); Richard Lochhead, Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Environment; Iain Gulland, Director Zero Waste Scotland; Sean McArthur, Food Manager and Sustainability Manager (IKEA) in front of a reverse vending pilot project for glass , aluminium and PET at the Edinburgh IKEA store.

Part of the Scottish Government’s Zero Waste Scotland programme, this pilot programme will look at ways in which schemes which offer incentives such as vouchers, donations to charities or money back may increase recycling rates and reduce the amount of used drinks containers going to landfill.

ikea_reward

Iain Gulland, Director, Zero Waste Scotland, said: “It’s vital that we consider fresh approaches to boosting recycling rates and capturing the value of materials which would otherwise be sent straight to landfill. Through this pilot, we want to assess the impact of this approach which has proved successful around the world, including in Germany, South Australia and Scandinavia. It’s important we change the way people view waste in Scotland and we’ll be looking at how incentivising these recycling schemes impacts on recycling rates and complements other schemes designed to capture valuable materials, including kerbside, recycling centres and banks.”

Iain Gulland, Director, Zero Waste Scotland,

Iain Gulland, Director, Zero Waste Scotland, said:

“It’s vital that we consider fresh approaches to boosting recycling rates and capturing the value of materials which would otherwise be sent straight to landfill.  

“Through this pilot, we want to assess the impact of this approach which has proved successful around the world, including in Germany, South Australia and Scandinavia.  It’s important we change the way people view waste in Scotland and we’ll be looking at how incentivising these recycling schemes impacts on recycling rates and complements other schemes designed to capture valuable materials, including kerbside, recycling centres and banks.”

The aims of these trials are to understand public acceptance of such schemes and the impact they might have in terms of increasing recycling rates and the quality of materials deposited as well as seeing whether they help prevent litter. I’ve talked up the importance of these trials over the past year, not because I’m particularly pro-deposit return, but because I’m keen to have a debate about what the future might hold for recycling systems here in Scotland.

I’ve been lucky to see deposit schemes in operation around the world.  In some areas they have helped recycling rates for packaging such as plastic bottles and cans reach 85%, compared with current rates in Scotland of less than 30%. Deposit schemes appear to engage with consumers in a way that many of our kerbside collections only dream about. Isn’t it time we wondered why?

But increasing recycling isn’t the full story. Quality of material is also important, especially if our priority is how to best benefit Scotland’s economy.

In Adelaide in Australia, I toured an aggregation centre for their deposit scheme that has been in place since the 1970s. There I witnessed bales of the highest quality plastics bottles, and cans. An established system for collecting plastic to such an obvious high quality would, I believe, strengthen the business case for plastics reprocessing facilities in Scotland, bringing investment and jobs as well as quality material recycled back into production. A report from Spain on a proposed deposit scheme there suggested that as many as 14,000 jobs could be created. What could a deposit system mean for Scottish jobs?

Of course I accept that there are counter arguments and potential consequences of  moving to a deposit scheme approach and I am, as ever happy, to debate these.  I think it is essential we continue to think about how we collect materials in order to develop our economy, not just for today but into the future.

Anyone who saw the History of Rubbish series on the BBC last year will know that collections systems have always evolved and I have a feeling that things will change again.  Of course, that might not just mean deposit schemes; it could also include shifting to service models, buying not leasing, or more retailer take-back schemes.

We are increasing our understanding of how important it is to look at the whole system in terms of resource supply and use.  The trials we launched today may or may not hold all of the answers, but at the very least they should ignite a debate on how systems might be re-thought to ensure we do get the most from our resources, just as we all believe we should.

Please visit Zero Waste Scotland Website for more informtion

To learn more, please visit the Scottish Governments Website

Please visit Reverse Vending Corporation’s Website 

What is Reverse Vending ?

Reverse Vending Machines, (RVM’s) are automated machines that utilise advanced technology to identify, sort, collect and process used beverage containers.

The IKEA “Recycle and Reward” project is an Award Winning Project

Ross Burns a Project Manager from Zero Waste Scotland – was voted as the winner of the “Young Recycler of The Year” 2013

Young Recycler of the Year Award 2013 - Winner Ross Burns - host Sally Magnusson - Hugh Stewart Shank

Young Recycler of the Year Award 2013 – Winner Ross Burns – host Sally Magnusson – Hugh Stewart Shank

The IKEA  “Recycle and Reward” Project also won the coveted Gold Green Apple Award

Winners of a 2014 Green Apple Award

Winners of a Gold Green Apple Award

Please contact Reverse Vending Corporation for further information > website 

 

 

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3 Years ago ( Original Press Release)

IKEA LAUNCHES RECYCLE AND REWARD SCHEME

 

Reverse Vending BottleBill Project Scotland Reverse Vending Corporation

Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Environment Richard Lochhead

IKEA paves the way for Scotland with modern recycling

 

IKEA is amongst nine companies and organisations trialling a Recycle and Reward Scheme, which will reward people for recycling glass, aluminium and plastic (PET) drinks containers through a range of incentives such as money back, discount vouchers or loyalty point by using the reverse vending machine.

 

Recycle and Reward ay IKEA

At IKEA, shoppers will be able to recycle any glass, plastic or aluminium drinks containers purchased from the restaurant, shop, or vending machines in their Edinburgh and Glasgow stores. Once returned and deposited through the machine, for each item shoppers will be offered the choice of a 10p voucher to redeem in-store or a 10p donation to one of the stores’ selected charities.
Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Environment Richard Lochhead said:
“Years ago, we thought nothing of taking our empty glass bottles back to the shops with the added bonus of getting cash back in our pocket. Now thanks to modern technology we are breathing new life into this traditional approach through the Recycle and Reward scheme. By offering customers incentives such as money back or vouchers for recycling their glass bottles and cans when out shopping, at college or at a music festival, I hope we can encourage more people to recycle on the go.

Shoppers will be able to recycle any glass, plastic or aluminium drinks containers purchased from the restaurant, shop, or vending machines in IKEA Edinburgh and Glasgow stores.  Once returned and deposited through the ‘IKEA Reverse Vending’ machine, each customer will be offered the choice of a 10p voucher to redeem in-store or a 10p donation to one of the stores’ selected charities.

Recycle and Reward , IKEA , Zero Waste Scotland , Reverse Vending ,

Thanks to new trials from Zero Waste Scotland and IKEA you can get something back for recycling!

 

It is hoped that the local pilot projects, part of the Scottish Government’s Zero Waste Scotland programme, will encourage people to recycle more in order to limit the amount of used drinks containers going to landfill.

IKEA_EDINBURGH_REVEND

Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Environment Richard Lochhead visited IKEA in Edinburgh today to see the first of the ‘reverse vending’ machines and hear how the retailer is introducing the scheme in its Scottish stores as a key part of its sustainability programme. The scheme also launches today at IKEA Glasgow.

 

Reverse Vending at IKEA

IKEA Reverse Vending Machine gives 10p reward for each used IKEA drink can or bottle returned through a Reverse Vending Machine

Theo Wiedenmann, Store Manager, IKEA Glasgow, said:

“At IKEA, we are committed to ensuring sustainability is at the heart of what we do. We have many different initiatives in place in stores across the UK and also as a company, so we are thrilled to be the first business to trial the ‘Reward and Recycle’ scheme at both of the Scottish stores. We are excited about this great addition to IKEA Glasgow and hope it will play apart in making sure recycling is always front of mind for both our customers and co-workers alike.”

IKEA is no stranger to sustainability with many schemes and initiatives taking place at both IKEA Glasgow and IKEA Edinburgh.

Nationwide IKEA is campaigning to raise awareness of making the ‘smarter switch to a better bulb’ in order to help families struggling with ever-increasing energy bills, and encourage sustainable living in the home. From February 2013, the retailer announced its investment of £1.1 million to halve the price of its ‘LEDARE’ LED light bulbs in a bid to help millions of UK consumers save up to a third on their energy bills by using less energy in their homes. LED lighting uses 85% less energy than incandescent bulbs and can last up to 20 years – 20 times longer than traditional incandescent bulbs.

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The First in the UK – A newly designed and built reVend Reverse Vending Recycling “Recycle and Reward” Machine installed at Queens Hospital Romford

February 5, 2016

Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust and Sodexo, have installed an innovative reverse vending recycling machine for the collection and recycling of used PET Plastic drink bottles and used Drink cans at Queens Hospital Romford.

There are over 100,000 Reverse Vending Machines installed around the World, this is the First one in Essex.

Queens_Hospital_first_reward_2016

The unique recycling machine was designed and built following months of research and teamwork to enable the Queens Hospital to capture and recycle used drink containers used “On the Go” at Queens Hospital. This is an additional facilities option for staff, patients and visitors to encourage and incentivise for doing more recycling in the Hospital.

bhrut-logo   sodexo-logo336-623318

Recycle and Reward

The initiative is brought in partnership with the Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust and Sodexo. The rewards will vary to match the objectives and deliverables at the Trust.

First Reward

The first reward was a prize draw to win Fit-Bit sponsored by Sodexo to encourage Health and Well-being.

The first draw happened on 29th January 2016 and the winner is Gill Sullivan from Sodexo

Gill Sullivan, Green Machine - Recycle and Reward first Winner.

Gill Sullivan from Sodexo receiving her reward a Fit-bit and certificate presented by Neil Woodhouse from Sodexo – Costa Healthcare

juhuj

The first reward was a prize draw to win Fit-Bit sponsored by Sodexo to encourage Health and Well-being.

CZpk1C0WQAEZKU3

This is the “FIRST” of this model recycling machine of its type and has been jointly designed by Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust and Sodexo.

IMG_2206

The machine was developed by Reverse Vending Corporation.

Reverse Vending is “proven” technology which has been used for over five decades, these fifth Generation Reverse Vending Machines are able to automate the recovery and recycling of thousands of used beverage containers each week.

Recycle and Reward

The machine will automate the collection of used beverage containers (used Plastic drink bottles and used drink cans) and reward the recycler with a reward voucher.

The machine will automate the collection of used beverage containers (used Plastic drink bottles and used drink cans) and reward the recycler with a reward voucher

The machine will automatically dispense  a reward voucher

The reward offering will be changed throughout the year to keep the recycler interested and motivated, the latest reward offering will be displayed on the large 32” built in digital (smart) online signage screen on the machine.

digitaltv

By rewarding the recycler we know that we are able to increase recycling activity and awareness, whilst reducing litter.

state of the art Reverse Vending technology and even compacts items by up to 90% of their original volumes and stores them ready for recycling

State of the art Reverse Vending technology  compacts items by up to 90% of their original volumes and stores them ready for recycling

Reduction in Waste Costs

The reVend Reverse Vending Machine installed at Queens Hospital uses state of the art Reverse Vending technology and even compacts items by up to 90% of their original volumes and stores them ready for recycling

With a large storage capacity and compaction of the items, the machine requires less emptying, reducing staff time as waste volume and quantity is reduced in other onsite bins. When the machine is full, the machine sends email alerts allowing for the resources to be collected and stored on site until a large enough quantity is collected. Installing one Reverse Vending Machine has the equivalent C02 saving of taking 2,000 cars off the road.

Queens Hospital is the first to install this unique reverse vending recycling machine in the UK. Customers who recycle their used drink cans and drink plastic bottles will automatically receive a reward voucher from the recycling machine to use in-store.

 

The new range of recycling machines will help increase national recycling amounts and assist companies and organisations comply with their recycling targets and environmental recycling obligations.

Queens_green_machine_2

The machine will be officially launched by Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust and Sodexo in the near future

 

The next winner will win a NutriBullet – to make delicious, nutrious smoothies with the nutrition extractor. The draw will take place on Thursday, 24th March 2016.

nutribullets-alt

For further details please visit www.reVend.co.uk

bhrut-logo

The Trust has a strong commitment to be Sustainable in its operations and reduce its impact on the environment and enhance our patients and visitors experience.  To accomplish this, we work in conjunction with our contractors to deliver our Sustainability objectives by implementing various projects and initiatives.

This particular Queen’s Green Machine initiative will help with :

  • Highlighting an example of the Trust working in partnership with  partners such as Sodexo and achieving mutual objectives
  • Provide additional option/facilities for staff, patients and visitors to recycle more and reward for it.
  • Helps in increasing recycling rates (by avoiding some of the bottles/cans ending in clinical or food waste bins).
  • A good public image of the Trust and contractors in promoting Sustainability and helping the environment.
  • Wider benefits through various targeted rewards/prizes over the time.

Get a FREE Koppla, E27 bulb convertor when you recycle any Light Bulb at IKEA Gateshead Light Bulb Machine in January and February 2016

January 28, 2016

Get a FREE Koppla,  E27 bulb convertor 

(90295615 Koppla bayonet to E27 )

http://www.ikea.com/gb/en/catalog/products/90295615/

When you recycle any Light Bulb at IKEA Gateshead  Light Bulb Machine in January and February 2016

Reverse Vending ® invented and designed the technology to enable the safe collection of CFL (mercury containing) Domestic Light Bulbs from IKEA customers. IKEA customers receive a reward for each light bulb recycled.

Reverse Vending  invented and designed the technology to enable the safe collection of CFL (mercury containing) Domestic Light Bulbs from IKEA customers. IKEA customers receive a reward for each light bulb recycled.

 

Product Detail 90295615 Koppla bayonet to E27  worth £1

Valid from  1st January 2016  to  29th February 2016

KOPPLA B22 to E27 bulb converte

KOPPLA
 E27 bulb converter

The Light Bulb Reverse Vending Recycling Machines are sited in prominent positions for the Public to see the initiative in action as they need to be encouraged to improve recycling.

Low energy bulbs contain a small amount of mercury, we want to stop that going into people’s dustbins and landfill

This machine takes the bulb away and rewards the customer, the machine recognises that it is a light bulb

The recycler is guided through the simple process by an exciting touch screen menu, the user then receives a reward incentive voucher, automatically dispensed by the machine.

The touch screen enables the user to choose from a large selection of different rewards, the user may even choose to donate to charity.

The user may choose a voucher for Free Coffee or they may choose to donate 10 pence to one of the four Corporate Charities UNICEF ,WWF , Save The Children, The Woodland Trust

Donate to a charity or receive a free minilamp

Donate to a charity or receive an exciting offer

reVend worked closely with IKEA, conducting a 14 month pilot at IKEA Lakeside testing Customer interface, incentive rewards and technology.

IKEA and customer requirements were studied by reVend when using the new technology and compliance with Legislative Drivers.

reVend Light Bulb Recycling Machine
The reVend Light Bulb Reverse Vending Recycling machine was developed by reVend utilising existing proven reverse vending platforms with added new technologies including mercury fume extractors, soft drop mechanism and light bulb video recognition.

The Light Bulb Recognition Database is updated regularly.The machines are automatically updated via telemetry from anywhere in the world by authorised users.If a new light bulb is launched on the market, the database is updated automatically to all reVend light bulb recycling reverse vending machines around the world.

Recycle and Reward Recycle light bulbs

The recycling data of every light bulb received is transmitted to the secure central database via telemetry to enable for the first time real recovery and recycling statistics.
The Light Bulb Database is updated via telemetry to every machine, ensuring that ALL Light bulbs are accepted by the reVend machines.
The reVend machines automatically send a text and/or an email when the secure light bulb storage container is nearly full and needs to be emptied, therefore reducing journeys by the waste management company.

The reVend patented Light Bulb Recycling Reverse Vending Machine ensures that ALL Low Energy Light Bulbs are safely collected and safely stored, ready for recycling. read more

Safety is the main feature of this machine with an automated soft drop system to safely collect and lower the light bulbs into a special collection container and an onboard mercury fume extractor and mercury fume filter to remove any mercury fumes. read more

The reVend light bulb recycling machines automatically send a text or email when the secure light bulb storage container is nearly full and needs to be emptied.

Light_Bulb_Recycling_Machine_features

 http://www.light-bulb-recycling.co.uk/Light_Bulb_Recycling_Case_Study.html

http://www.ikea.com/gb/en/catalog/products/90295615/?query=902+956+15

Environment Secretary announces next steps to explore opportunities of Deposit Return Scheme.

January 2, 2016
Reverse Vending BottleBill Project Scotland Reverse Vending Corporation

Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Environment Richard Lochhead

Environment Secretary announces next steps to explore opportunities of Deposit Return Scheme.

Retailer costs and the implications for small stores need further consideration before a decision is reached on a deposit return scheme for Scotland, Environment Secretary Richard Lochhead has said.

It comes as a Zero Waste Scotland report is published today identifying some of the issues involved in setting up and operating such a system. The report summarises evidence from deposit return experts and operators from other countries as well as drinks companies and trade bodies, retailers and logistics companies, environmental organisations and local government.

The Environment Secretary confirmed he has commissioned further research from Zero Waste Scotland – and intends to discuss the issues further with other Ministers from across the UK.

IKEA_EDINBURGH_REVEND

Mr Lochhead said:

“Like carrier bag charging, deposit return schemes attach a value to items that can otherwise be viewed as waste, and have proven successful in other countries at reducing litter and increasing recycling.

“The evidence gathered by Zero Waste Scotland highlights some of the potential benefits and concerns associated with a deposit return system for Scotland. I am listening closely as I consider whether such a scheme – which has worked successfully in other countries – would be right for Scotland.

(L-R) Sofie Rogers, Store Sustainability Responsible (IKEA); Richard Lochhead, Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Environment; Iain Gulland, Director Zero Waste Scotland; Sean McArthur, Food Manager and Sustainability Manager (IKEA) in front of a reverse vending pilot project for glass , aluminium and PET at the Edinburgh IKEA store.

(L-R) Sofie Rogers, Store Sustainability Responsible (IKEA); Richard Lochhead, Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Environment; Iain Gulland, Director Zero Waste Scotland; Sean McArthur, Food Manager and Sustainability Manager (IKEA) in front of a reverse vending pilot project for glass , aluminium and PET at the Edinburgh IKEA store.

Mr Lochhead said:

“In light of Belgium’s recent suggestion for an EU-wide deposit return scheme to help tackle litter and recycling, I intend to invite Ministers from Wales, Northern Ireland and the UK Government to Edinburgh next spring to discuss these new findings.

Mark_Durkan

Mr Lochhead said:

“In the meantime, I have asked Zero Waste Scotland to undertake further work to look into the important issues raised by businesses, NGOs, and local government which include the implications for small stores, costs to retailers, and changes in customer behaviour where a deposit return scheme has been in place.”

Zero Waste Scotland’s study earlier this year explored the role that such a scheme could play in reducing litter, complementing local authority recycling services, and improving the quality of materials recycled.

Reverse Vending at IKEA

IKEA Reverse Vending Machine gives 10p reward for each used IKEA drink can or bottle returned through a Reverse Vending Machine

Original Story http://news.scotland.gov.uk/News/Deposit-return-consideration-20e8.aspx

Notes To Editors

At the request of Scottish Government, Zero Waste Scotland published a feasibility study, by Eunomia Consulting, on the feasibility of introducing a national deposit-return system in Scotland, in May 2015.

The feasibility study was an initial step in exploring the issue of deposit return – the study does not represent a proposal from the Scottish Government.

This was followed by a call for evidence, to expand on the issues raised in the feasibility study.

The summary of the call for evidence and responses can be found at –http://www.zerowastescotland.org.uk/content/summary-deposit-return-scheme-scotland-call-evidence-responses and http://www.zerowastescotland.org.uk/content/deposit-return-scheme-scotland-call-evidence-responses

The full report and Call for Evidence are available at

http://www.zerowastescotland.org.uk/DepositReturnSystems

Zero Waste Scotland’s call for evidence identified a number of areas where further work would be beneficial to fully consider the impacts of a Deposit Return Scheme. The Scottish Government has asked ZWS to give further consideration to the following priority issues, drawing where appropriate on experience in other countries:

• More accurately quantifying material “within scope” of a Deposit-Return system

• Evaluating the interaction with kerbside collections provided by Local Authorities

• Assessing the time requirements for public participation

• Retailer and manufacturing costs including space requirements, online shopping etc.

• Factors affecting countries that have decided against DRS

• More accurately identifying the value of litter reduction and improved recycling

• Impact on price

• Consideration of hygiene issues in-store and during haulage

• Evidence of behaviour change

 

Also See >>  http://www.reversevending.co.uk/

Also See >> http://www.recycle-and-reward.co.uk/ 

https://reversevending.wordpress.com/2015/05/23/drinks-cash-deposit-scheme-in-scotland-new-report-explores-options-2/

 

Charity calls for 10p bottle deposit to reduce litter

November 19, 2015

 

Visit BBC News website >> 

Reverse Vending BottleBill Project Scotland Reverse Vending Corporation

Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Environment Richard Lochhead

 

Northern Ireland are also looking at a Deposit System

A “money back” recycling scheme, in whichused drinks containers are exchanged for cash, could be re-introduced in Northern Ireland.

Northern Ireland’s Environment Minister Mark H Durkan said it could help to reduce litter and boost recycling.

He said a deposit scheme, where the public received 10p for each glass bottle they returned, had operated in Northern Ireland in the past.

The minister is awaiting the results of similar pilot projects in Scotland.

Norther_Ireland

‘Potential costs’

Over the last two years, the Scottish government has been exploring how a Deposit Return System (DRS) for drinks bottles and cans could work within its jurisdiction.

It asked Zero Waste Scotland to commission a feasibility study, the results of which was published last month.

The Scottish research found there were no major obstacles to a DRS recycling scheme, but industry leaders issued a warning about the potential costs to businesses.

Mr Durkan has now asked his own officials in Stormont’s Department of Environment to begin work on a feasibility study in Northern Ireland.

“It’s something I’ve been thinking about since I actually took up my ministerial role nearly two years ago now,” Mr Durkan told BBC Radio Foyle.

“I’m always keen to explore ideas about how we move towards a zero waste society, which is my ultimate ambition and I believe that’s an ambition which should be shared by all of us.”

Mark_Durkan

Mr Durkan said he believed the ending of the previous cash-back bottle recycling scheme in Northern Ireland was cost-driven, because “advances in production” methods had reduced the price of manufacturing drinks containers.

‘Back to go forward’

However, he said the public and businesses were now more aware that cheaper production methods could mean long-term costs for the environment.

“We, as a society, have changed a lot over the years,” the minister said.

“We haven’t always changed for the better and I think it’s important that we do everything we can to change for the better again, and if that means going back to go forward, I’m certainly prepared to do that.

“We know a lot more about recycling now, we know a lot more about the damage the practices we have been carrying out over decades and centuries have been doing to the environment.”

In a statement, Mr Durkan’s department said the proposed system would accept the “broadest range of materials and the suggested deposit would be between 10p and 20p, depending on volume”.

“Deposits would be returned manually by retailers or through automated reverse vending machines,” it added.

Original Story BBC News >> 

Reverse Vending www.reversevending.co.uk

The First in the UK – A newly designed and built reVend Reverse Vending Recycling “Recycle and Reward” Machine installed at Queens Hospital Romford

November 1, 2015

Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust and Sodexo, have installed an innovative reverse vending recycling machine for the collection and recycling of used PET Plastic drink bottles and used Drink cans at Queens Hospital Romford.

 A newly designed and built reVend Reverse Vending Recycling “Recycle and Reward” Machine installed at Queens Hospital Romford

A newly designed and built reVend Reverse Vending Recycling “Recycle and Reward” Machine installed at Queens Hospital Romford

The unique recycling machine was designed and built following months of research and teamwork to enable the Queens Hospital to capture and recycle used drink containers used “On the Go” at Queens Hospital.

This is the “FIRST” of this model recycling machine of its type and has been jointly designed by Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust and Sodexo.

IMG_2206

The machine was developed by Reverse Vending Corporation.

Reverse Vending is “proven” technology which has been used for over five decades, these fifth Generation Reverse Vending Machines are able to automate the recovery and recycling of thousands of used beverage containers each week.

Recycle and Reward

The machine will automate the collection of used beverage containers (used Plastic drink bottles and used drink cans) and reward the recycler with a reward voucher.

The machine will automate the collection of used beverage containers (used Plastic drink bottles and used drink cans) and reward the recycler with a reward voucher

The machine will automatically dispense  a reward voucher

The reward offering will be changed throughout the year to keep the recycler interested and motivated, the latest reward offering will be displayed on the large 32” built in digital (smart) online signage screen on the machine.

digitaltv

By rewarding the recycler we know that we are able to increase recycling activity and awareness, whilst reducing litter.

state of the art Reverse Vending technology and even compacts items by up to 90% of their original volumes and stores them ready for recycling

State of the art Reverse Vending technology  compacts items by up to 90% of their original volumes and stores them ready for recycling

Reduction in Waste Costs

The reVend Reverse Vending Machine installed at Queens Hospital uses state of the art Reverse Vending technology and even compacts items by up to 90% of their original volumes and stores them ready for recycling

With a large storage capacity and compaction of the items, the machine requires less emptying, reducing staff time as waste volume and quantity is reduced in other onsite bins. When the machine is full, the machine sends email alerts allowing for the resources to be collected and stored on site until a large enough quantity is collected. Installing one Reverse Vending Machine has the equivalent C02 saving of taking 2,000 cars off the road.

Queens Hospital is the first to install this unique reverse vending recycling machine in the UK. Customers who recycle their used drink cans and drink plastic bottles will automatically receive a reward voucher from the recycling machine to use in-store.

 

The new range of recycling machines will help increase national recycling amounts and assist companies and organisations comply with their recycling targets and environmental recycling obligations.

Queens_green_machine_2

The machine will be officially launched by Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust and Sodexo in the near future

 

For further details please visit www.reVend.co.uk

Get a FREE Jansjo, LED USB light, when you recycle any Light Bulb at IKEA Gateshead Light Bulb Machine in October 2015

September 30, 2015

Get a FREE Jansjo, LED USB light, assorted colours, article number 702 898 04

When you recycle any Light Bulb at IKEA Gateshead  Light Bulb Machine in October 2015

Reverse Vending ® invented and designed the technology to enable the safe collection of CFL (mercury containing) Domestic Light Bulbs from IKEA customers. IKEA customers receive a reward for each light bulb recycled.

Reverse Vending invented and designed the technology to enable the safe collection of CFL (mercury containing) Domestic Light Bulbs from IKEA customers. IKEA customers receive a reward for each light bulb recycled.

 

Product Detail  IKEA JANSJÖ  LED USB light, asstd colours, article number 702 898 04

Worth £2.00

Built-in LED light source.
LED life time approx. 20.000 hours.
Light colour; warm white (2700 Kelvin).
Energy consumption: 0.15W.

IKEA JANSJÖ LED USB light

IKEA JANSJÖ LED USB light

web : http://www.ikea.com/gb/en/catalog/products/70289804/

Package measurement and weight
Article Number: 702.898.04
Package:: 1
Width: 7 cm
Height: 2 cm
Length: 8 cm
Weight: 0.04 kg
People & Planet

The Light Bulb Reverse Vending Recycling Machines are sited in prominent positions for the Public to see the initiative in action as they need to be encouraged to improve recycling.

Low energy bulbs contain a small amount of mercury, we want to stop that going into people’s dustbins and landfill

This machine takes the bulb away and rewards the customer, the machine recognises that it is a light bulb

The recycler is guided through the simple process by an exciting touch screen menu, the user then receives a reward incentive voucher, automatically dispensed by the machine.

The touch screen enables the user to choose from a large selection of different rewards, the user may even choose to donate to charity.

The user may choose a voucher for Free Coffee or they may choose to donate 10 pence to one of the four Corporate Charities UNICEF ,WWF , Save The Children, The Woodland Trust

Donate to a charity or receive a free minilamp

Donate to a charity or receive an exciting offer

reVend worked closely with IKEA, conducting a 14 month pilot at IKEA Lakeside testing Customer interface, incentive rewards and technology.

IKEA and customer requirements were studied by reVend when using the new technology and compliance with Legislative Drivers.

reVend Light Bulb Recycling Machine
The reVend Light Bulb Reverse Vending Recycling machine was developed by reVend utilising existing proven reverse vending platforms with added new technologies including mercury fume extractors, soft drop mechanism and light bulb video recognition.

The Light Bulb Recognition Database is updated regularly.The machines are automatically updated via telemetry from anywhere in the world by authorised users.If a new light bulb is launched on the market, the database is updated automatically to all reVend light bulb recycling reverse vending machines around the world.

Recycle and Reward Recycle light bulbs

The recycling data of every light bulb received is transmitted to the secure central database via telemetry to enable for the first time real recovery and recycling statistics.
The Light Bulb Database is updated via telemetry to every machine, ensuring that ALL Light bulbs are accepted by the reVend machines.
The reVend machines automatically send a text and/or an email when the secure light bulb storage container is nearly full and needs to be emptied, therefore reducing journeys by the waste management company.

The reVend patented Light Bulb Recycling Reverse Vending Machine ensures that ALL Low Energy Light Bulbs are safely collected and safely stored, ready for recycling. read more

Safety is the main feature of this machine with an automated soft drop system to safely collect and lower the light bulbs into a special collection container and an onboard mercury fume extractor and mercury fume filter to remove any mercury fumes. read more

The reVend light bulb recycling machines automatically send a text or email when the secure light bulb storage container is nearly full and needs to be emptied.

Light_Bulb_Recycling_Machine_features

 http://www.light-bulb-recycling.co.uk/Light_Bulb_Recycling_Case_Study.html

Get a FREE Koppla, B22 to E27 bulb convertor when you recycle any Light Bulb at IKEA Gateshead Light Bulb Machine in August and September 2015

July 31, 2015

Get a FREE Koppla, B22 to E27 bulb convertor 

When you recycle any Light Bulb at IKEA Gateshead  Light Bulb Machine in August and September 2015

Reverse Vending ® invented and designed the technology to enable the safe collection of CFL (mercury containing) Domestic Light Bulbs from IKEA customers. IKEA customers receive a reward for each light bulb recycled.

Reverse Vending  invented and designed the technology to enable the safe collection of CFL (mercury containing) Domestic Light Bulbs from IKEA customers. IKEA customers receive a reward for each light bulb recycled.

 

Product Detail Koppla, B22 to E27 bulb convertor 2 pack (Article Number : Item 902 956 15) worth £1

Product on IKEA Website >>

Valid from Saturday 1st August 2015  to Wednesday 30th September 2015

Get a FREE Koppla, B22 to E27 bulb convertor (Article Number : Item 902 956 15)

Get a FREE Koppla, B22 to E27 bulb convertor (Article Number : Item 902 956 15)

KOPPLA B22 to E27 bulb converte

KOPPLA
B22 to E27 bulb converter

The Light Bulb Reverse Vending Recycling Machines are sited in prominent positions for the Public to see the initiative in action as they need to be encouraged to improve recycling.

Low energy bulbs contain a small amount of mercury, we want to stop that going into people’s dustbins and landfill

This machine takes the bulb away and rewards the customer, the machine recognises that it is a light bulb

The recycler is guided through the simple process by an exciting touch screen menu, the user then receives a reward incentive voucher, automatically dispensed by the machine.

The touch screen enables the user to choose from a large selection of different rewards, the user may even choose to donate to charity.

The user may choose a voucher for Free Coffee or they may choose to donate 10 pence to one of the four Corporate Charities UNICEF ,WWF , Save The Children, The Woodland Trust

Donate to a charity or receive a free minilamp

Donate to a charity or receive an exciting offer

reVend worked closely with IKEA, conducting a 14 month pilot at IKEA Lakeside testing Customer interface, incentive rewards and technology.

IKEA and customer requirements were studied by reVend when using the new technology and compliance with Legislative Drivers.

reVend Light Bulb Recycling Machine
The reVend Light Bulb Reverse Vending Recycling machine was developed by reVend utilising existing proven reverse vending platforms with added new technologies including mercury fume extractors, soft drop mechanism and light bulb video recognition.

The Light Bulb Recognition Database is updated regularly.The machines are automatically updated via telemetry from anywhere in the world by authorised users.If a new light bulb is launched on the market, the database is updated automatically to all reVend light bulb recycling reverse vending machines around the world.

Recycle and Reward Recycle light bulbs

The recycling data of every light bulb received is transmitted to the secure central database via telemetry to enable for the first time real recovery and recycling statistics.
The Light Bulb Database is updated via telemetry to every machine, ensuring that ALL Light bulbs are accepted by the reVend machines.
The reVend machines automatically send a text and/or an email when the secure light bulb storage container is nearly full and needs to be emptied, therefore reducing journeys by the waste management company.

The reVend patented Light Bulb Recycling Reverse Vending Machine ensures that ALL Low Energy Light Bulbs are safely collected and safely stored, ready for recycling. read more

Safety is the main feature of this machine with an automated soft drop system to safely collect and lower the light bulbs into a special collection container and an onboard mercury fume extractor and mercury fume filter to remove any mercury fumes. read more

The reVend light bulb recycling machines automatically send a text or email when the secure light bulb storage container is nearly full and needs to be emptied.

Light_Bulb_Recycling_Machine_features

 http://www.light-bulb-recycling.co.uk/Light_Bulb_Recycling_Case_Study.html

http://www.ikea.com/gb/en/catalog/products/90295615/?query=902+956+15

‘Cash for bottles’: Back to the future for Northern Ireland recycling?

June 29, 2015

A “money back” recycling scheme, in which used drinks containers are exchanged for cash, could be re-introduced in Northern Ireland.

Northern Ireland’s Environment Minister Mark H Durkan said it could help to reduce litter and boost recycling.

He said a deposit scheme, where the public received 10p for each glass bottle they returned, had operated in Northern Ireland in the past.

The minister is awaiting the results of similar pilot projects in Scotland.

Norther_Ireland

‘Potential costs’

Over the last two years, the Scottish government has been exploring how a Deposit Return System (DRS) for drinks bottles and cans could work within its jurisdiction.

It asked Zero Waste Scotland to commission a feasibility study, the results of which was published last month.

The Scottish research found there were no major obstacles to a DRS recycling scheme, but industry leaders issued a warning about the potential costs to businesses.

Mr Durkan has now asked his own officials in Stormont’s Department of Environment to begin work on a feasibility study in Northern Ireland.

“It’s something I’ve been thinking about since I actually took up my ministerial role nearly two years ago now,” Mr Durkan told BBC Radio Foyle.

“I’m always keen to explore ideas about how we move towards a zero waste society, which is my ultimate ambition and I believe that’s an ambition which should be shared by all of us.”

Mark_Durkan

Mr Durkan said he believed the ending of the previous cash-back bottle recycling scheme in Northern Ireland was cost-driven, because “advances in production” methods had reduced the price of manufacturing drinks containers.

‘Back to go forward’

However, he said the public and businesses were now more aware that cheaper production methods could mean long-term costs for the environment.

“We, as a society, have changed a lot over the years,” the minister said.

“We haven’t always changed for the better and I think it’s important that we do everything we can to change for the better again, and if that means going back to go forward, I’m certainly prepared to do that.

“We know a lot more about recycling now, we know a lot more about the damage the practices we have been carrying out over decades and centuries have been doing to the environment.”

In a statement, Mr Durkan’s department said the proposed system would accept the “broadest range of materials and the suggested deposit would be between 10p and 20p, depending on volume”.

“Deposits would be returned manually by retailers or through automated reverse vending machines,” it added.

Original Story BBC News >> 

 

Reverse Vending www.reversevending.co.uk

Reverse Vending Scotland support for Deposit Return Scheme

May 23, 2015

70% Support Bottle Return Scheme in Scotland 

Reverse Vending at IKEA

IKEA Reverse Vending Machine gives 10p reward for each used IKEA drink can or bottle returned through a Reverse Vending Machine

ALMOST four out of five Scots back the introduction of a deposit refund system for drinks in bottles and cans, a survey has found.

The Association for the Protection of Rural Scotland (APRS) said Scottish ministers are now “looking positively” at such a scheme in a bid to increase recycling rates.

The Scottish Government already has the power to introduce such an initiative under the Climate Change (Scotland) Act of 2009 and APRS has now published polling showing 78.8 per cent are in favour of this.

While shoppers would have to pay a deposit when buying drinks in cans and bottles, this would be refunded to them when they returned their empty containers.

Results from pilot “reverse vending machines”, in which people put bottles and cans to obtain a refund,  in Edinburgh have been encouraging, according to APRS, while similar schemes are up and running in Denmark, Canada and Germany.

The research by Survation showed that 41.1 per cent of people are strongly in favour of such a scheme, with a further 37.7 per cent giving it “somewhat support”.

National deposit return systems already operate in many other countries, as a measure to improve recycling and cut litter. The systems see customers pay a small cash deposit when they buy a drink in a can or bottle, and get the money back when they return the item to a collection point. The items can then be recycled into new containers or other packaging.

Recycle and Reward , IKEA , Zero Waste Scotland , Reverse Vending ,

Thanks to trials from Zero Waste Scotland and IKEA you can get something back for recycling! Image courtesy of Reverse Vending Corporation

Only 3.3 per cent strongly oppose it, with a further 5.2 per cent being somewhat against the move, leaving 12.7 per cent who are neither for or against it.

APRS director John Mayhew said: “These results are a robust mandate for ministers to do the right thing and bring in a deposit refund system for Scotland.

“We know it works in other countries, tackling litter, reducing waste, boosting recycling and supporting good new jobs in the circular economy.

“We also know that the current approach means cans and bottles end up as landfill and litter, wasting resources, spoiling our environment on land and at sea, and forcing up costs to councils across Scotland.

“As with the carrier-bag charge, some in big business will complain about it in advance, even though it’s roughly cost-neutral, and as with the carrier-bag charge the evidence from elsewhere is that a deposit refund system will just work for Scotland.”

WWF Scotland director, Lang Banks said: “Deposit and return systems which encourage refilling and recycling have been shown to work successfully elsewhere, so it’s very encouraging to see the vast majority of Scots would welcome their introduction here.

“We currently live very wasteful lifestyles which in turn damages nature and our climate. And, if everyone in the world used the amount of resources we do, we would need three planets to survive.

“Therefore, reducing the amount of waste we produce coupled with achieving much higher levels of recycling is essential if Scotland is reduce its environmental and carbon footprints.”

Zero Waste Scotland’s research has assessed the benefits and challenges of a deposit return system in Scotland, gathering evidence from a range of key players including deposit return experts and operators in other countries; drinks companies and trade bodies; retailers and logistics companies.

The study explores the role that such a scheme could play in reducing litter, complementing local authority recycling services, and improving recyclate quality.  It also considers the potential costs of such a system. The study models what a Scottish system could look like, based on a comprehensive comparison of other systems operated across the globe.  The model included a deposit of between 10p and 20p per item, and covered all drinks and containers, including bottles, cans and cartons.

Image courtesy of Reverse Vending Corporation

Image courtesy of Reverse Vending Corporation

Today’s report is being launched in tandem with a call for evidence to industry and other stakeholders on the role of a deposit return system.

Iain Gulland, Chief Executive, Zero Waste Scotland, said:

Iain Gulland, Director, Zero Waste Scotland, said: “It’s vital that we consider fresh approaches to boosting recycling rates and capturing the value of materials which would otherwise be sent straight to landfill. Through this pilot, we want to assess the impact of this approach which has proved successful around the world, including in Germany, South Australia and Scandinavia. It’s important we change the way people view waste in Scotland and we’ll be looking at how incentivising these recycling schemes impacts on recycling rates and complements other schemes designed to capture valuable materials, including kerbside, recycling centres and banks.”

Iain Gulland, Director, Zero Waste Scotland,

“Scotland has set ambitious targets for moving towards zero waste, and we know that many drinks cans and bottles are not currently being recycled and may end up as very visible litter.

“Deposit return systems have been used in many other parts of the world to prevent waste and increase recycling.  So this new report, which assesses how such a scheme could work in Scotland, is an important contribution to the debate about how we achieve our zero waste goals and move towards a more circular economy.

“The research explores how a deposit return system could work in Scotland, and the issues to consider in designing and implementing a system.  That’s why we are also launching a call for evidence today to understand the impacts of such a system and how it could work most effectively.”

Environment Secretary Richard Lochhead said:

Reverse Vending BottleBill Project Scotland Reverse Vending Corporation

Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Environment Richard Lochhead

“I welcome the work done by Zero Waste Scotland in putting together this study and report.  And I will be interested to see additional evidence from industry and stakeholders in due course.

“A scheme like the deposit return has the potential to be very beneficial for the environment – reducing litter and boosting the recycling of these materials and their value.  As we have seen with carrier bag charging, attaching a value to something can be very effective in helping us make small but important changes.

“Countries such as Germany, Sweden and Norway already have such systems in place as do parts of Canada, Australia and the United States.  I am keen to explore the opportunities for Scotland from deposit return and will be highlighting these studies with my counterparts in England, Wales and Northern Ireland to invite them to do likewise.”

 

Source :  http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/environment/78-support-bottle-deposit-scheme.126878730

Source :  http://www.reversevending.co.uk/